Posted by Charles Edge on November 4th, 2015

One of the common tasks to perform when doing some larger iOS deployments is to restore an iOS device as part of setting the device up for users. Restoring a device will retain a few things like icon placement on a device. To restore a device, we’ll first create a backup, described here. As of Apple Configurator 2, you can use iTunes and Apple Configurator 2-sourced backups of devices. You can also now assign the restore task to a Blueprint or do so manually.

To get started with restoring a device, first plug in a device and open Apple Configurator.

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Right-click on a device and then choose the Restore from Backup… option.

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You’ll then be prompted to verify that you want to restore the device. To restore the device, click Restore.

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At the “Restore from the backup screen”, select the backup to use as your restore point and click Restore.

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When prompted, provide the password for the backup and click on the Restore Backup button.

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If the device has been prepared, you will be prompted to approve the restore. Assuming you actually want to restore the device, click on the Restore button.

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You will need to accept the iOS licensing agreement. Click Accept when prompted.

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The restore will start.

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You can also assign a Back Up to a Blueprint. Then, any time the Blueprint is assigned to a device, you will restore the selected backup. To do so, bring up the Edit Blueprint screen and then right-click on the Blueprint to edit.

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Select Restore from Backup… from the menu and select the appropriate backup. Then, when the Blueprint is applied to a device, the device will be restored using the selected backup.

Posted by Charles Edge on November 3rd, 2015

MacTech is a conference for the Mac engineer and developer. And at JAMF Software, whether you prefer the Casper Suite or Bushel, we love to hang out with engineers and developers. So we’ll be at MacTech this week, in Southern California, hanging out to meet you, answer any questions you might have, and maybe have people from product management ask you lots of questions. If you’ll be there, come find us. For more on MacTech, check it out at:

http://conference.mactech.com/schedule/

MacTech_Conference_2015-Gradient-logo-250

Posted by Charles Edge on October 30th, 2015

A common question we get in the media is whether or not an employer can look at email on an employees device. The answer is that an employer cannot use Bushel to see mail or content on a device. This isn’t to say that you can’t use your Exchange, Office 365, or Google Apps administrative accounts to view your email. But Bushel doesn’t have anything to do with that.

Apple has a strong sense of privacy around devices. Devices should be able to be used to access your data (email, app content, etc) in such a way that you have no concern about the privacy of that data. You cannot view what someone is doing on a device unless that user specifically AirPlays their display to another device. You cannot see data as it’s being transferred to devices. You cannot see what Apple ID is used on a device.

But you can secure the data. You can silo your organizations data using Managed Open-In. This allows you to flag all data coming through mail accounts and apps that your organization gave a device so that those files cannot be copied to mail accounts and apps that your organization did not give a device. This doesn’t mean you can see those files, or access them. Only that you can control how they move within devices.

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Overall, the privacy controls for iPads and iPhones are the most well thought out and well orchestrated security controls in the industry. A user can have a solid sense that their data is only able to be viewed by them, without concern that prying eyes are creeping on their devices. And an employer can have a sense of security that their data can be pulled from devices they own and BYOD devices, in the event that there is turnover or a device falls outside of their control.

Posted by Charles Edge on October 28th, 2015

Security is multi-layered. Bushel enables some settings on your Macs that help to keep you secure. But there’s another layer that we believe in: Backup. We protect devices, but a good backup ensures the long-term availability of the data that is on those devices, giving you the peace of mind to wipe or erase a device in the event that the device falls outside your control.

There are a number of tools to backup your Macs. The first and probably most important to discuss is Time Machine. Time Machine is free. There aren’t a lot of options. As with many Apple services, Apple has made some key discussions on your behalf. With Time Machine, you plug in a drive, say backup to it, and then boot holding down the R key to restore in the event of a system failure. I’m not really sure you can get an easier backup tool.

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Many will need more options.  For those, I recommend checking out CrashPlan. They have a free option, where you can backup to your friends computers (your data is encrypted and safe) or backup to their cloud. It’s not bootable for restores, but the raw technology that is built into the product is super-impressive (from data deduplication and other nerdiness to a clean user interface).

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In addition to CrashPlan, there are other tools, including BackblazeCarbonite, Mozy, iDrive, OpenDrive, SOS, and DollyDrive. These are the more common tools that we see for the Mac clients. There are certainly larger products that support tape libraries and the such, including P5 from Archiware. But for many reading this site, those are likely overkill.

No matter what you do, make sure that you know exactly what steps you will perform in the event of a file being deleted, of a whole system failure, and if you need to restore a backup to another computer for eDiscovery purposes. And good luck out there!

Posted by Charles Edge on October 27th, 2015

Bushel gives you three devices for free. But you can get more free devices if you like the product and choose to share it with your friends and family. To do so is pretty straight forward. Simply click on the Accounts icon in the sidebar and then click on the Profile tab. Here, towards the bottom of the screen, you’ll see the Referrals section.

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Here, you have a link you can use in emails, Tweets, LinkedIn, etc. There are also icons that allow you to share your referral code in the more popular social networks. If someone signs up for an account, we’ll give you another free device permanently. You can get up to 10!

We hope you love Bushel as much as we do, and we hope you’ll choose to share it with friends so they can love it to!