#ipad

Posted by Charles Edge on November 4th, 2015

One of the common tasks to perform when doing some larger iOS deployments is to restore an iOS device as part of setting the device up for users. Restoring a device will retain a few things like icon placement on a device. To restore a device, we’ll first create a backup, described here. As of Apple Configurator 2, you can use iTunes and Apple Configurator 2-sourced backups of devices. You can also now assign the restore task to a Blueprint or do so manually.

To get started with restoring a device, first plug in a device and open Apple Configurator.

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Right-click on a device and then choose the Restore from Backup… option.

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You’ll then be prompted to verify that you want to restore the device. To restore the device, click Restore.

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At the “Restore from the backup screen”, select the backup to use as your restore point and click Restore.

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When prompted, provide the password for the backup and click on the Restore Backup button.

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If the device has been prepared, you will be prompted to approve the restore. Assuming you actually want to restore the device, click on the Restore button.

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You will need to accept the iOS licensing agreement. Click Accept when prompted.

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The restore will start.

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You can also assign a Back Up to a Blueprint. Then, any time the Blueprint is assigned to a device, you will restore the selected backup. To do so, bring up the Edit Blueprint screen and then right-click on the Blueprint to edit.

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Select Restore from Backup… from the menu and select the appropriate backup. Then, when the Blueprint is applied to a device, the device will be restored using the selected backup.

Posted by Charles Edge on October 30th, 2015

A common question we get in the media is whether or not an employer can look at email on an employees device. The answer is that an employer cannot use Bushel to see mail or content on a device. This isn’t to say that you can’t use your Exchange, Office 365, or Google Apps administrative accounts to view your email. But Bushel doesn’t have anything to do with that.

Apple has a strong sense of privacy around devices. Devices should be able to be used to access your data (email, app content, etc) in such a way that you have no concern about the privacy of that data. You cannot view what someone is doing on a device unless that user specifically AirPlays their display to another device. You cannot see data as it’s being transferred to devices. You cannot see what Apple ID is used on a device.

But you can secure the data. You can silo your organizations data using Managed Open-In. This allows you to flag all data coming through mail accounts and apps that your organization gave a device so that those files cannot be copied to mail accounts and apps that your organization did not give a device. This doesn’t mean you can see those files, or access them. Only that you can control how they move within devices.

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Overall, the privacy controls for iPads and iPhones are the most well thought out and well orchestrated security controls in the industry. A user can have a solid sense that their data is only able to be viewed by them, without concern that prying eyes are creeping on their devices. And an employer can have a sense of security that their data can be pulled from devices they own and BYOD devices, in the event that there is turnover or a device falls outside of their control.

Posted by Charles Edge on October 27th, 2015

Bushel gives you three devices for free. But you can get more free devices if you like the product and choose to share it with your friends and family. To do so is pretty straight forward. Simply click on the Accounts icon in the sidebar and then click on the Profile tab. Here, towards the bottom of the screen, you’ll see the Referrals section.

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Here, you have a link you can use in emails, Tweets, LinkedIn, etc. There are also icons that allow you to share your referral code in the more popular social networks. If someone signs up for an account, we’ll give you another free device permanently. You can get up to 10!

We hope you love Bushel as much as we do, and we hope you’ll choose to share it with friends so they can love it to!

Posted by Charles Edge on September 16th, 2015

iOS9-6s-Features

There’s lots for businesses to be excited about with iOS 9. From easier multitasking on iPad, commuting with Transit view in Maps, enhanced notes, to an all new News app—there are lots of ways that business users can make the most of their iPads and iPhones by migrating to iOS 9. We encourage users to take advantage of iOS 9. Their devices will remain fully compatible with Bushel.

As your users get ready to update, below are some best practices around updating an iOS device:

Always backup your device before running a software update. This can be done with either iCloud or iTunes (or both). Having a proper backup ensures that you’ll never risk losing information. This article provides more details on how to backup: https://www.apple.com/support/iphone/backup/

Users should know ALL of their passwords before updating. This includes their Apple ID password, iCloud password, email password and any other account credentials that may be saved on the device. These passwords may need to be entered again after the update. If a user has forgotten his or her Apple ID password, it can be changed at iforgot.apple.com.

Let your users know that there could be some downtime with their device during the update. Their device can be used while the update is downloading, however installation will restart the device.  This can take anywhere from 5-15 minutes to complete the install. 

After the device is up-to-date, the user may be asked to enter passwords. After passwords are entered, users should also run any available app updates. Many apps will already have updates ready for the iOS 9 release and over the course of the next few days, most apps will have updates. It is important to run these updates to ensure all of your apps are optimized to run on iOS 9.

If you have any issues with your iOS 9 update, head on over to support.apple.com or visit your local Apple Store for assistance.

Posted by Charles Edge on September 4th, 2015

One of those funny calls we get every now and then is about how to block someone from calling or texting you. There are two main ways to go about this. The first is if someone is in your contacts. The second is if someone isn’t.

To block someone that is in your iPhone’s contacts:

  • Open the Settings app from your home screen
  • Tap on the Phone option (scroll down a little)
  • Tap on Blocked
  • Tap on Add New
  • At the All Contacts window, you’ll see everyone in your Contacts/Address Book
  • Scroll to the contact you need to block and tap on that contact
  • Tap Block
  • The name is then added to the list of blocked contacts

To block a number for a new user that isn’t in your contacts:

  • Open the Phone app
  • Tap Recents
  • Tap the blue i icon to the right of the number.
  • At the bottom of the contact tap on Block or Block This Caller
  • When you see “You will not receive phone calls, messages, or FaceTime from people on the block list” tap on “Block Contact”

Once added, use the Blocked option in the Phone section of the Settings app to remove a contact if you decide you no longer hate them at some point in the future.